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Fighters History protection chip

I found an interesting project on a backup harddrive from 2002 which was the ‘Trojan horse’ software I wrote to analyse the software protection device on the Data East Fighters History arcade pcb game.

I doubt the code itself is very useful anymore but the process it used may still be interesting.  You can download the files >here

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FH used an ARM cpu – ARM cpus are everywhere these days but were still quite rare in 1993!  Coupled to this was a copy protection chip that essentially had a range of input ports the CPU could write to and modified results could be read back.  By writing game code variables to the chip and the code that read them back ‘knowing’ the permutation that would be applied the copy protection was quite effective.  Unless you knew all the hardware permutations game code would at worst crash and at best behave incorrectly – drawing wrong graphics, game moves not working correctly, etc.  Because it was close to impossible to guess what the protection chip did just by examining the software the only solution is to run special software on the board that deliberately probes the protection device by writing known values and examining the results returned.  Hence ‘Trojan horse’.

Unlike earlier 8 and 16 bit games it was actually feasible to use a modern C compiler to write code to run on this device, so the official ARM c compiler was used (circa 2000) and the flow was C program -> .o ASM file -> patch ASM into original ROM image -> split ROM image into 2 16 bit images -> burn ROMs to EEPROM -> install EEPROMs on board -> get results!

The main components on the pcb board below are A – the ARM cpu (not marked as ARM – they only licensed the design so the chip was fabricated for Data East and is marked as such).  B – two 16 bit program EEPROMs – the 16 bit data buses are interleaved to provide a 32 bit stream for the CPU.  C – the protection chip itself.  The fact it’s mounted on a daughterboard suggests it was added to the hardware design fairly late.

fh

 

Recently I noticed Charles Macdonald had furthered the work I done on this – http://cgfm2.emuviews.com/new/detech.txt

 

 

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